8 results for "moshe dayan"

Issues & Analyses

Options and Realities for Biden’s Foreign Policy in the Middle East

President Biden comes to the presidency with more Washington experience than any other former president. While he has designated a foreign policy team with significant experience, his immediate priorities will be domestic. With a razor thin senate majority why would he expend political capital in trying to find solutions to Middle Eastern issues that are highly complex, seemingly intractable, and culturally embedded? The exception might be seeking to curtail Iran's nuclear and regional aggressiveness.

Issues & Analyses

Using Transcripts, Interviews and Conference Proceedings to Write History

In writing history, documents and primary texts are reliably accurate. Veracity can emerge by crosschecking sources. However, if all we have is one shard of pottery from the second temple period, we must settle for it in isolation as evidence of how the pottery was constructed, its composition, use, etc. Unless of course, we are fortunate enough to have a text that describes the pottery piece, and we have the piece of pottery as evidence. When oral recollections are used to bolster the written text, subtle shades and emphatic dimensions provide colorful detail to historical writing. Unlike written records, oral evidence provides vignettes, opinions, hues, suppositions, and sentiments almost always absent in a document.

Issues & Analyses

The Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty at 40: Lessons Learned and Impacts Sustained

On a stormy evening on Sept. 17, 1978, with President Jimmy Carter as their witness, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin stepped to a table at the White House and signed the Camp David Accords, consisting of two framework agreements: an outline for the Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty and a scaffold for planning self-rule for the Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, held by Israel since the June 1967 war. Six months later, on March 26, 1979, the three men gathered again at the White House to sign the peace treaty. But their path to the ceremony 40 years ago was hardly smooth.